Non-Christian

The following is an amalgam of 3 non-christian homeschooling mums ideas about curriculum:


We have found the Christian content is in nearly everything for hs curriculum as that is the main market in USA.

I basically just overlook content that our family doesn't believe in.

Apologia is very Christian focused but we have enjoyed using it, Dr Wile does give different theories but he is honest & says he leans towards his belief. Our daughter enjoys the science experiments & enjoys science. We also have many family discussions around the dinner table from this curriculum! Also as science is just NOT my thing - I brought it as it teaches the child (& mum) as we go. They also have a great back up system if mum gets stuck! - via email.

For starting HS we enjoyed Five In A row curriculum there is a bible study which is optional


General NZ Series
ESA revision books

Maths
Math-U-See - http://www.mathusee.com
Saxon Maths (& Physics)

English
Primary Language Lessons http://www.lcbcbooks.com/primary.htm
Spelling Power
IEW http://www.writing-edu.com/
Gettby Italics
Preparing for Secondary English http://www.phoenixeduc.com/primary/Prep_Sec_English/Prep_Sec_English.htm
Reading

History
Timeline
NZ My History- My People

Geography
Trail Guide to World Geography http://www.geomatters.com/products/details.asp?ID=6
My Skills Book

Science
Handbook of nature Study
Science is.. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0590740709/002-6520337-9999215?v=glance&n=283155
Apologia - General Science http://www.highschoolscience.com/

Home Economics
Cooking with mum
Making soups & bread

Clothing & Textile
Cross Stitch  -
learning basic sewing - apron, table mats, serviettes

Wood & Metal work
Eel Trap

P.E.
Basketball


I don't think any material should be discounted just because of its world view, the beauty of home educating is that you can discuss material and create debate about how material contains bias in a way that might not happen in a classroom situation.  We take a relaxed and eclectic secular approach to our home education.  Sometimes we strew although as the children have gotten older we have moved to looking at options and then choosing a programme that each child wants to use to develop the skills they feel are important at the time.  

Like L I like Apologia because the experiments are easy to do from materials you have around the home and there are clear explanations of what might happen and why.  We tend to work on it together but it can be used independently.

My 10 yo daughter likes the Great Science Adventures series although if you are a parent who doesn't like fiddly stuff, making books and the like, it is probably not for you.  Details and sample lesson can be seen at http://www.greatscienceadventures.com/  On the other hand my 10yo son hates them (too arty crafty.)

For writing we have available Wordsmith (Apprentice for 10yo and Wordsmith for 14yo)  http://www.commonsensepress.com/wordsmth.htm  which is preferred by the girls.

My anti writing son is making great strides using Writers Jungle and in fact we all enjoy freewrites together http://www.bravewriter.com/home.html   Julie Bogart is so relaxed and makes great suggestions which create a Brave Writer life style.  We have adopted the movie lunchtime once a week which has broadened  our viewing habits and created lots of great discussion.  We have also started Thursday Teatime - I think this is a Charlotte Mason idea - and it is also very productive and great fun.  We have to have Wednesday baking to provide for Thursday Teatime so home economics is covered and it all comes together nicely.

All of the authors of these materials are Christian but I do not find the Christian perspective overwhelming.

I have one organised child who thrives on Saxon Math, one who will do any maths you put in front of her and one who has learned heaps from reading murderous maths.  I love the eclectic approach espoused on the yahoo group  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LivingMathForum/ and the associated website http://www.livingmath.net/

I would also recommend the Newhouse series (this is now 'Cengage') that L mentioned.  I have found if you leave them until the children can do them quickly they take in a lot of good general knowledge.  They don't feel pressured and get a feeling of mastery and achievement as they can skoot through a unit in about 10 minutes.  There are now four books in the series covering NZ geography, history, the legal framework - parliament, the courts, voting, the census, gettign a passport etc, and world affairs - where countries are, tourist features, the commonwealth, the UN etc.  I like these because they put NZ at the centre and we do need to keep in mind our children are New Zealanders when if we use a lot of of overseas material.